Call Best Bully Sticks (877) 483-5853

Want Coupons & Sale Updates?


Privacy Policy
Archive

Dogs and Kids: Introducing a New Dog into your Home

This is the 2nd post in a series by Deborah Rosen of Good Citizen Dog Training.

Last week’s post, Dogs and Kids: What you Need to Know, addressed items to consider when thinking about getting a dog for your family.

Get off on the right paw!

As promised in the last blog entry, I will now address some of the proper steps to take when introducing a new rescue dog or puppy to his or her new family. By taking these few easy steps, you will give your new fur baby a much better chance of succeeding with each new member of your household, especially with the children.

On the very first day the dog is due to arrive at your home, arrange for each person in your household to be present, even if they have all met the dog before. Ask each one to step outside the house where the dog will feel less confined and be more apt to feel less threatened.

Tuesday awaiting treatTake Things Slowly

Have each family member stand at least 5 feet from the dog. One at a time, have each adult and child call the dog’s name without looking directly at the dog. If the name has not yet been selected, a noise or a whistle will work just as well to simply get the dog’s attention. The second the dog looks at the individual, pop a very tasty treat in his or her mouth and say “good job” or “good dog.” Do this with each person, one by one. By doing this, we are telling the dog (in a way he can really understand) that the person he just encountered is a “very good thing”. And, by doing this with each person, you are helping the dog understand he has nothing to fear.

Assuming the dog had no difficulty with step one, move to the next step by having each person come up to the dog, one at a time. As they do, tell them to approach the dog sideways without giving the dog eye contact. It’s important, especially with small children to be very clear and concise. “Don’t look at the doggy yet.” Have them present the dog with an open palm and let the dog sniff. Quickly drop a treat in the child’s hand and let the dog take the treat. Do this over and over several times, and if the dog is comfortable, proceed to the next person.

shutterstock_79959028

Do this process over and over until the entire household is introduced without giving eye contact. If this process goes well without incident, start again with everyone now facing the dog squarely and looking directly at him. Once this process is complete, it’s time to go inside the house.

 

Check back next week for next steps to when introducing a new dog to your home.

 

 

Deborah Rosen_small About the Author

Deborah Rosen is President and Founder of Good CitiZEN Dog TrainingⓇ, a dog training franchise business based in Tacoma, WA. Deborah is known within the industry for her innovative ZEN dog-training methodology and her commitment to using positive and progressive techniques to teach clients the science of canine behavior. Deborah is now spreading her training philosophy of “peaceful living with your dog” from coast to coast through her Good CitiZEN Dog Training franchisees. In addition, Deborah also authors blogs, magazine articles, and is working on a book. For more information about Good CitiZEN Dog Training, see www.goodcitizendog.com.

Happy Dogust First!

With logo For all pet parents out there who don’t know their adopted dog’s birthday, August 1 is the perfect time to celebrate! DOGust 1st is the official birthday for any shelter pets whose date of birth is unknown. August 1 is now a globally-accepted holiday that gives these amazing animals their much-needed support and recognition!

While many parents celebrate their dog’s birthday on the day he orshe was adopted, now parents and their dogs can join everyone in this festive occasion! One day a year, dog lovers nationwide are able to wish their family, friends, and neighbors, a ‘Happy Dogust 1st’ and spoil their dogs with delicious treats or chews. Let’s celebrate the fact that shelter animals around the world have found (and will find) loving forever homes!

North Shore Animal League America’s spokesperson, Beth Ostrosky, said, “A birthday celebration is an opportunity to express our sentiments for one another. These wonderful animals, many still waiting patiently in shelters for their adopters, are so full of life and love, and live to please us. Now we have a day set aside to honor them and return the unconditional love and adoration they give us, day after day. These sweet animals crave our affection and company, so we can imagine the warm feelings they will experience from all the extra attention on their special day, DOGust the First.” It is truly a wonderful time of year, and it’s a great excuse for spoiling the amazing dog in your life!

Best Bully Sticks dog-rescue-support-contributions
Best Bully Sticks Contest: Marvelous Mutts Photo Contest
If you don’t have a rescued dog yourself, you can still give back to local dogs waiting for their forever homes by donating some delicious chews and treats.
read more…

Dogs Do the Funniest Things Essay Contest Winner: Jordan

In May, Best Sticks held an Essay Contest asking our fans to submit stories of their funny dogs. Dogs are, after all, are a great source of fun and laughter in our lives!

The winning entry from Brittany C. about their Pitbull named Jordan is below. He’s quite the character, as you will see!

 

Jordan in the back seat Funniest Things essay contest Best Bully Sticks

Jordan

“We knew right away Jordan was meant to be ours. Named after Michael Jordan for his superb jumping skills, our rescued pitbull came bursting into our lives full of energy and love. He was our foster pup for a whole 5 minutes before we wanted to make it official, mainly because of his hilarious personality. God certainly has a sense of humor, and he brought us Jordan as a reminder to lighten up a bit!
read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #192: How To Have a Happier Dog

When your dog wags his tail, you know that he is excited, but is he content? BestBullySticks.com knows that you try to provide your dog with the absolute best, but your dog’s happiness is more than just two meals a day and a belly rub. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a way to look at human motivation by piecing out essential physical, emotional and mental needs. With dogs being highly social creatures, many of these principles can be applied to develop a more complete four-legged best friend. Read on to find out how you really can have a happier dog.

Physiological (Pyhsical Needs)
Fresh Clean Water – Your dog’s water should be refreshed daily and free of debris. If a water bowl is kept outside, make sure it’s not stagnant (this can breed disease), frozen in winter or overheated in summer.

Good Nutrition – Every dog owner will have a different recipe for success with their dog’s food. There is no one right answer, but feeding your dog healthy and nutritious meals is important. Talk to your vet about good feeding options for your dog. Make sure your dog is in a healthy weight range as well; overweight dogs are very unhappy. Treating your dog is something that shouldn’t be hard either. A good bully stick or all-natural chew from BBS will guarantee your dog is getting a healthy, nutritious treat.

Exercise – Is your dog getting enough exercise? For the best health, your dog needs to expend their energy (which they always have plenty of). Exercise will make your dog’s life longer and fuller and prevent compulsive disorders or unwanted behavior. Breeds are different in their exercise needs, but all dogs do need it.

Hygiene – As much as possible, your dog needs to stay clean so they are comfortable in their own body and skin. Little things like dirty ears, long nails or tartar on teeth can lead to very serious and painful problems. Keeping a clean, brushed coat, trimmed nails, clean ears and teeth are one less potential discomfort your dog has to feel.

Chewing – Unlike humans, dogs have a need to chew. Providing the proper toys and chews will help them meet this desire without taking it out on your belongings.

A Place to “Go” – It’s very important for dogs to have a consistent place to use the bathroom away from their “den.” A highly normal dog will eliminate away from where they eat and sleep. Doing otherwise means they feel as if they aren’t given proper time or a place to do so. read more…

BBS Celebrates: Adopt A Senior Dog Month!

Adopting a dog can be one of the most rewarding decisions you ever make. However, you want to head into this decision with a lot of wisdom and research. Adopting puppies is great, but BestBullySticks.com wants to let you in on another choice that might be even better for your family: adopting an adult or senior dog.

November is Adopt-A-Senior Dog Month, so here are some reasons why adopting an oldie but a goodie might be a wonderful option.

Less Work: Puppies are a lot of work: they need lots of just about everything including exercise, training, socialization and more. For most old dogs, this is old hat.

Mature in Every Way: An older dog already has a well-defined personality, emotional and physical characteristics. Whereas a puppy goes though many changes, a mature dog doesn’t hide much.

Good for First-Time Adopters: If you’re a first time adopter, or even dog owner, an older dog is probably the best match for you! This way a future puppy parent can ease in to dog ownership and responsibility, whereas adopting a puppy requires much more time for training, exercise and socialization. Instead of potential chaos, you’re more likely to get plenty of calm and ease from a senior dog.

Will Love You Just As Much: No matter a senior dog’s former life, dogs have very large hearts and when they’re truly cared for, will love their companions wholly.

Be A Rebel: At a shelter, many people overlook older dogs, but you can be a rebel! Do something others don’t: love on an older dog. BestBullySticks.com knows it will be a rewarding experience.

To find out more about adopting a senior dog, read the ASPCA’s Top Ten Reasons to Adopt an Older Dog

Have you adopted an adult or senior dog? Tell us your success stories! 

Dog Care 101: Tip # 163: Rescuing A Stray Dog

 

Best Bully Sticks loves supporting animal shelters and rescues. (In fact, every Tuesday the Healthy Dog Blog highlights a rescue or shelter.) It’s pretty easy to figure out that our readers and customers genuinely care and hurt for rescue animals. But what happens when rescuing a dog falls into your own hands? Best Bully Sticks knows at some point you’ll see a dog in need, whether you’re driving or just happen upon a loose, unattended dog. Today BBS will go over the correct way to handle the rescue of a stray dog.

Your Initial Reaction:
Remember that your initial reaction is key. If you’re in your car, do not slam on your breaks. There’s no reason to get in a wreck. If you’re walking by your self, do not startle the dog.  Any dog, no matter how friendly, can act out when scared.

If You Don’t Feel Comfortable:
If there is any reason you don’t feel comfortable rescuing the dog, don’t proceed! Whether it’s because you’re alone, you’re nervous or scared, or just don’t feel confident, by all means, don’t try to rescue the dog. Dogs can sense fear and you don’t want to provoke the dog in any way. Call your local SPCA, or 411 number to find out who to contact. Provide your nearest animal rescue organization with as much information as you can: coloring, markings, breed, color of collar, gender and where you last saw the dog and which direction it was heading.

 

 

 

DO NOT:
If you decided to help the dog, here are some absolute no-no’s.

-Do not chase the dog. If you run, the dog will run and that could mean out into traffic, or just away where you can’t follow.

-Do not move suddenly or speak loudly. Again, you don’t want to frighten or provoke the dog.

-Do not proceed if the dog becomes aggressive. We shouldn’t have to say it, but it won’t be worth it or help either one of you if you are hurt. 

Securing the Dog:
This part of the process is a very delicate one. First, try calling the dog to you and maybe even offer a treat and incentive. If you’re on the road, try slowly opening the door and see if the dog jumps in.  Dogs who are used to riding in cars will be familiar with this. If you don’t feel comfortable riding in the car with the dog, call your local SPCA or Animal Rescue to meet you where you are. If you happened upon the dog in your neighborhood, trying coaxing the dog into a fenced in yard or any closed off area. read more…

%d bloggers like this: