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Dog Care 101: Caring for a Sick and Dehydrated Dog

Got Water? Water is essential to humans and pets for a healthy & happy life. When dogs becomes ill, it’s very easy for them to become dehydrated & lethargic.

Canine dehydration is a serious issue that can become life-threatening if not properly treated. It is important to constantly hydrate your dog back to health.

Here are some simple tips on how to care for a dehydrated sick dog and get him on the road to recovery & back to his old tricks again:

1. Seek out a certified vet. Your dog may be too ill or dehydrated for you to nurse her back to health and may need vet observation of emergency assistance.
read more…

National Pet First Aid Awareness Month

Emergencies do happen. Making it to the vet can be difficult, especially in the middle of the night. That is why being familiar with Basic First Aid procedures for pets is a great way to minimize harm and prevent emergency situations.

First and foremeost: Advanced veterinary first aid should only be administered by certified individuals or a veterinarian. Even if you’re certified to administer first aid on people, don’t try to play veterinarian! The American Red Cross is a great resource for education on the subject and even offers courses in Pet First Aid. Here are some basic steps you can take to ensure that both you and your pet prepared for anything.

First Aid Supplies

Keep a list of phone numbers on hand including your veterinarian’s number, and others like the Animal Poison Control Center: 888-4ANI-HELP (888-426-4435) and a local emergency veterinary clinic. In the event something happens to you, keep a friend’s number handy who is capable of caring for your pet in your absence. It’s also a good idea to maintain your pet’s medication and vaccination history for reference. The American Veterinary Medical Association has compiled a comprehensive list of pet first aid supplies that should be in your emergency kit.

Basic Procedures and Treatments

As important as these supplies are, proper knowledge of their use is crucial. BestBullySticks encourages all pet owners to become familiar with basic pet first aid. To get you started, we’ve put together a brief guide below outlining some common pet-related emergencies and treatments.

Choking

One of the most common emergencies, symptoms include difficulty breathing, coughing and an excessive pawing of the mouth. First, look into your pet’s mouth to see if any foreign objects are present. If there is something blocking their airway, use tweezers or a pair of pliers to gently remove the object. However, be careful not to push the object further down the throat or spend too much time trying to remove it; you might be better off seeking immediate medical attention.

Animal First Aid AwarenessFractures

Limping or an outright inability to use a limb is usually an owners first sign of fractures or breaks. Pets should be immediately muzzled and checked for any bleeding. Carrying your pet can cause further damage and they should be placed on a stretcher for transportation. Never try to set a break or fracture yourself. Done improperly, this may cause irreparable damage.

Seizures

Do not attempt to restrain your pet during a seizure. Doing so may injure you and your pet. Move any heavy objects your pet could bump into such as furniture and be sure to time the seizure (usually 2-3 minutes). After your pet has come back around, contact your veterinarian.

Bleeding (External)

After muzzling your pet, identify the injured area. Using gauze or a clean bandage, apply firm pressure to the affected area for at least 3 minutes or until bleeding stops. If bleeding is severe and located on your pet’s legs, use an elastic band or clean t-shirt as a tourniquet between the wound and body. Once you’ve stopped the bleeding, seek veterinary attention.

Poisoning

More difficult to identify, there are a wide range of symptoms exhibited by an exposure to toxins. Vomiting, convulsions,  diarrhea and weakness are among the most common. Do not induce vomiting. Instead, identify the source of poisoning and contact poison control.

sick dog

Animal CPR

If you ever discover you pet to be unconscious, administering CPR can save a life. The American Animal Hospital Association has assembled a thorough guide for performing pet CPR.

Of course, not everyone needs to be certified — or even take courses for that matter — but knowing how to respond and care for animals properly in an emergency situation is important. BestBullySticks hopes you never run into an emergency. Being prepared never hurts, though. From our selection of dog apparel — essential for extreme climates— to custom dog tags and leashes, we’ve got you covered! So take the time to review the information above and if you are interested, enroll in the American Red Cross’ first aid course.

For even more information, check out our four-part series on animal first aid covering first aid kits and disaster preparedness, treating dog burns, treating dog bites, and CPR and Heimlich for canines.

Doggy Travel Preparation Tips

Picture this: You’re headed out on a trip, and you think, “Did I get everything?” If you have to question it, chances are, you just might have! Best Bully Sticks knows preparation is everything!

As a professional organizer Bonnie Dewkett knows this, too. Bonnie is a Certified Professional Organizer and dedicates her life to forming “calm from chaos” through organizational systems. It’s not different when she travels with her dog Roxy, which she does often. Here is how she preps for a road trip with her pooch!

“I take my dog everywhere.  Most people take their dog in the car with them once in a while.  My dog is with me most often than not.  She only gets left home when I work with clients in their homes or offices.  And, when it’s going to be a long day she goes to “Grandpa’s Doggie Day Care.”

It’s important to me that Roxy is always comfortable and safe so there are a few things I did to make sure we are safe travelers.

The first thing I did to make travel easily is I designated a bag just for Roxy’s gear.  I keep it ready to go at all times.  It has a travel doggie bowl (plastic collapsible kind), a travel food bag, first aid supplies, a first aid bandana (for instructions), an extra leash, treats and toys. read more…

Dog Care 101 #223: Choosing a Pet Sitter

BBS Dog Care 101 - Choosing a Dog SitterSummer is prime time for vacation but sadly some dog owners don’t have the option of bringing their four-legged friends along. However, just because Fido can’t tag along doesn’t mean he can’t have fun at home while you’re away! BestBullySticks recommends owners look into getting a pet sitter as an alternative to dropping their pup off at the kennel.

Choosing between leaving your pup with a pet sitter or dropping him/her off at the kennel depends on a few key things. For instance, if your dog doesn’t play well with others, you’re better off finding a pet sitter. The one on one attention from a pet sitter can make all the difference to a dog when its owner is away. Also, leaving your dog in a familiar environment adds an extra level of comfort while their owner is away.

While finding the right pet sitter can sometimes be a challenge, we’ve assembled a handy list of tips and strategies to help ease the stress on your dog while you’re away.

Planning Ahead

First things first — make a list of important items your dog needs. At the very least, your list should include a leash, bags for waste, food, toys, medications, emergency phone numbers and plenty of bully sticks! Collect these items and set them aside for your pet sitter.

Keeping these items on hand will give a pet sitter more time to spend with your dog and less time looking for things he/she needs.

Selecting Your Dog Sitter

It’s important to find an individual you’re comfortable leaving with your dog and in your home. If possible, take the time to meet a few potential candidates for the job to make sure you find the right one. If you have a pet savvy friend or family member who is willing to watch your dog don’t hesitate to ask them. Dogs are often more comfortable with friendly faces visiting them at home than strangers. Picking someone your dog knows may have a big impact on their comfort level. read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #210: Pet First Aid Awareness

Pet First AidEmergencies do happen. And sometimes, finding your way to the doctor can be difficult. Becoming familiar with Basic First Aid procedures is a great way to minimize harm and bring stability to emergency situations. The first week of May is National Pet Week, and we at BestBullySticks wanted to get a head start helping raise awareness for animal first aid.

Even if you’re certified to administer first aid on people, don’t go trying to play veterinarian! Advanced veterinary first aid should only be administered by certified individuals or a veterinarian. The American Red Cross is a great resource for education on the subject and even offers courses in Pet First Aid. Let’s look at some basic steps to you can take to ensure both you and your pet prepared for anything.

Identification

While safety starts with proper identification, a collar and tags are only the beginning. Microchipping is now widely available and no longer prohibitively expensive. Pets sometimes get lost. And while collars can come off — or even worse be taken off — microchipping provides a surefire backup plan that will last a lifetime. Costing only $45 on average, microchipping is the first step to safety with your pet.

First Aid Supplies

Keep a list of phone numbers on hand including your veterinarian’s number, and others like the Animal Poison Control Center: 888-4ANI-HELP (888-426-4435) and a local emergency veterinary clinic. In the case something happens to you, keep a friend’s number handy who is capable of caring for your pet in your absence. It’s also a good idea to maintain a history of your pet’s medications and vaccinations for reference. The American Veterinary Medical Association has compiled a comprehensive list of pet first aid supplies that should be in your emergency kit. read more…

Dog Care 101: Tip #162 – Dog Water Safety Tips

Now that it’s warming up, Best Bully Sticks knows you’ll be flocking to the water. Any body of water will be teaming with folks looking to cool down. And why not take Fido along too? A lot of dogs enjoy the cool water too but owners need to be aware of the potential hazards of the water. Best Bully Sticks gets you and your dog ready for fun in the surf with these handy dog water safety tips!

Hang Out With Your Dog
Don’t leave your dog unsupervised. You brought your dog to the pool, lake or “swimmin’ hole” to hang out with you, right? Make sure you keep an eye on your dog. Not all dogs are good swimmers.

Buy & USE A Dog Life Jacket
Your dog might be an excellent swimmer, but he will eventually get tired, or be distracted or get a cramp. Buy and use a dog life jacket so your dog is always protected. Rip currents or undercurrents can also be a problem in larger bodies of water. You’ll always be happy you bought and put your dog in a life jacket.

Fun In The Sun & Surf
Best Bully Sticks offers a lot of great dog toys to bring out to the water. Floatable, durable and loads of fun, your dog will thank you for a great water toy! Check out BBS’s entire line of Balls for Dogs that will be great for the water. The West Paw Huck or Planet Dog Orbee-Tuff Medium Orbee are both great choices!

Provide Shade & Comfort
Sun and therefore heat is more intense around bodies of water because of the sun’s reflection and humidity. Make sure you dog has a place to escape to, such as a towel on the beach (hot sand can blister paws), or shade to get out of the sun.

 

Water, Water Everywhere, But Not A Drop To Drink

Make sure you have fresh, clean water for your dog to drink. Chlorinated pools or lake water can both cause serious health issues for your dog. Chlorine is poisonous to dogs and natural water can contain parasites. Keep a gallon of water and a pop-up bowl for your pup when he’s romping outdoors!

BBS has a great portable water solution. Check out the Handi-Drink Portable Bottle/Bowl for your next trip out to the water!

More Water After The Water
After you and your pup with your fun in the sun and surf, rinsing your dog with clean water is important. This will ensure that your dog won’t keep any unwanted chlorine, salt or water parasites. Make sure to take off and let your dog’s collar dry as not to cause any hot spots.

Do your dogs like to romp in the water? Tell us your favorite water story in the comments section!

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