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Dog Care 101 Tip #216: Animal Rights Awareness Week

If you hadn’t already heard, this week is Animal Rights Awareness Week! BestBullySticks, being all about everything dog-related, is using the opportunity to spread the word about animal rights. In honor of this important week, we’ve put together a brief history of animal rights as well as some valuable information about how you can become involved in your community.

Animal rights as we know them today are a far cry from centuries past. Luckily, modern times have brought about a progressive shift towards recognizing animal rights and welfare. Things began to change in the 19th century —  during these times there was a dramatic and sudden interest in animal protection. A movement which got it’s start in the United Kingdom would eventually spread worldwide and become law in many countries.

Baby Steps

Until the early 1800’s, people were only punished for animal cruelty because it was seen as a destruction of the owner’s property! However, thanks to some caring minds of the era, the animal rights movement slowly gained momentum. Initially, many activists focused their attention on “baiting” — a practice of setting game dogs against a captured or chained animal with the intent of incapacitating or killing it. The first major accomplishment in the protection of animals was made in the fight against baiting and led to the practice becoming illegal.

The first animal rights bill in history, named Martin’s Act, was introduced into Irish law in 1822. This groundbreaking set of laws sought to protect beasts of burden from abuse. People outside the United Kingdom were taking notes, too. Soon thereafter, other countries followed suit and by the 1850’s many Western nations had passed comprehensive laws with severe penalties for animal abusers. read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #214: Caring for Senior Dogs

As we near the end of “Adopt a Senior Dog Month,” we at BestBullySticks wanted to set aside some time for a very special group of dogs — seniors. For aging canines, there are special considerations that need to be kept in mind. Keeping a keen eye on behavior and general health in addition to some fine tuning in diet is all that’s needed to maintain healthy living into the senior years. Old age comes at different times for different breeds, though. That’s why we’ve put together a guide to not only identify aging, but also how to properly care for your dog as a senior.


Knowing what to look out for is half the battle. If you’re able to spot signs of health complications early, there’s a good chance the damage can be minimized. Here are some common health issues to watch out for:

Graying: Of course, there’s nothing dangerous about going gray, but it is a good indicator of middle-age and early seniority. It should be noted, some dogs go gray early despite still being quite young.

Vision & Hearing: Inevitably, vision and hearing deteriorate with old age. For vision, some signs to watch out for are increased clumsiness and cloudy eyes. Cloudy eyes, which are often harmless and a normal process of aging, are the product of lenticular sclerosis. This is sometimes confused with cataracts — a clouding of the lens inside the eye — which is very detrimental to sight. If a clouding of the eyes occurs, make sure you promptly pay a visit to the vet. read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #212: Holistic Flea and Tick Prevention

Holistic Pet MedicineMany pet owners gravitate towards name-brand flea and tick treatments and we don’t blame them! While effective and endorsed by many veterinarians, there are comparable alternatives without the nasty chemicals commonly found in these spot-treatments. BestBullySticks encourages owners to go the holistic route and use all-natural flea and tick prevention products to deter fleas and ticks this coming season.

Dangers of Chemical-Based Treatments

Spot treatment “medications” contain a wide variety of pesticides — including but not limited to pyriproxyfen, methoprene, permethrin, fipronil and imidacloprid — and are directly linked to serious health effects in laboratory tests. In 2008 there were over 44,000 reported cases of adverse reactions to these types of treatments.

Since these are pesticides, their distribution and use is controlled by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In a study conducted by the EPA, it was determined current guidelines and regulations used to determine toxicity for these medications were inadequate. Besides the toxic “active” ingredients listed, manufacturers are not required to disclose “inactive” ingredients leaving us in the dark about what we’re actually giving to our pets.

Because of the adverse reactions and questionable content of these treatments, BestBullySticks chooses to endorse holistic pet-care products. There are many ways pet owners can achieve the same results without having to turn to harsh unhealthy treatments. Let’s take a quick peek at these common pests and how we can prevent them! read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #211: Grooming Tips for Flea and Tick Prevention

Springtime Dog Grooming!Spring is now in full swing and BestBullySticks wants to make sure you and your dog get the most from the sunny months ahead. We’re discussing Springtime Dog Grooming Tips because a well groomed dog doesn’t just turn heads, it helps keep them healthy too!

Reasons to Groom

Grooming is an activity pets regularly conduct by themselves. They still need your help, though! There are a few reasons why grooming should be high on your list of dog-related priorities this spring. Regular grooming habits will not only decrease your pets chance of developing epidermal and oral health problems, it’s also a great way to create a strong bond, monitor your dog’s health and even help to prevent disease.

Lyme Disease

The first step to protecting your pet from Lyme disease is making sure they’re on the correct preventative medications. BestBullySticks suggests all-natural flea and tick medications as an alternative to the toxic ingredients found in many common medications. Spot treatments are filled with chemicals and have been proven to pose a threat to both pets and owners.

Caused by a bacteria from the genus Borrelia, the chance of contracting Lyme disease is much higher between May and August — the height of tick season. Here are a few early warning symptoms: read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #207: Spring Cleaning Your Dog

After a long winter, your house may be in need of “airing out” and sprucing up. But your house may not be the only thing. Your dog has been cooped up all winter and chances are he’s going to want to spend some quality time outdoors. BestBullySticks thinks Spring Cleaning your house and your can coincide!

Your Dog

Brushing: If your dog has put on his winter coat in the last few months, all that extra hair will be coming out soon, which leaves your house covered in dog fur tumbleweeds. Buy a quality brush to make your dog feel better and your house tumbleweed-free!

Flea, Tick & Heartworms: Warmer weather (unfortunately) means mosquitoes, which are the cause of multiple problems for your dog. Make sure you’re current with your dog’s flea, tick and heartworm medications and he’s getting them each month.

Dog Shampoo: Rinse the winter right out of your dog’s hair! A good shampooing with loosen any trapped fur and make your dog smell and feel great! Check out organic dog grooming products from Tropiclean at BBS! These products are naturally green and environmentally friendly!

Clean Out & Spruce Up: Take a look at your dog’s bed, blankets, collar and toys. If they’re worn out or frayed, replace them. Make sure to wash beds and blankets to freshen them up.

Your Home

Muddy Dogs: Spring rains plus your dog’s need to play equals a muddy dog. Train your dog to wait at the door before he comes inside to get his paws cleaned.

Protect Your Furniture: If your muddy dog somehow slips by you, you can still protect your furniture! Use an old bed sheet or the pet furniture covers from SureFit. These form fitting covers are a beautiful and effective solution for protecting your furniture.

Use Safe Cleaning Products: Use all-natural, pet-friendly cleaning products in your home. These products protect your over curious dog from ingesting harsh chemicals.

Keep Your Dog Calm:  If your dog becomes nervous when you clean the house, distract him to keep him calm. A great distraction is a bully stick or all natural dog chew, which will last your dog until you finish the room he’s in!

We hope your Spring Cleaning for both your home and your dog goes well!

What are you doing to spruce up your dog this Spring? Share your comments below! 

Dog Care 101 Tip #205: Natural Pet Stain Removal

You have a good dog, but as one of the great laws of nature states, “accidents happen” and inevitably—your dog is going to pee on the carpet. Whether your dog is a puppy learning, an older dog or just couldn’t get the to door quick enough, there will inevitably be an “uh-oh” on the rug. So how do you clean it up and clean it up well? is here to help with some natural cleaning solutions for pet stain removal.

Treat the Stain ASAP

Using newspaper, eco-friendly paper towel or a rag, blot the stain from the outside to the inside to pick up moisture. If you’re dealing with carpet or a rug, try to get to all layers of flooring including padding. The most important part of pet stain removal is not only removing the stain but the smell. If the smell still exists after you clean, your dog has the potential to return to this spot and eliminate again.

Homemade Pet Stain Removers for Carpets & Rugs

Make your own pet stain remover from items you most likely have in your kitchen cupboard.

  • Baking Soda: You already know baking soda as a natural odor remover, so why not use it on pet stains? Throw soda into your wash if your dog has soiled machine-washable items. You can also use baking soda in the first step in carpet or rug treatment. Sprinkle soda onto the pet stain and allow it to soak up any remaining moisture. After awhile, vacuum up the soda and follow one of the following treatments.
  • Hydrogen Peroxide: Mix 12 ounces of Hydrogen Peroxide, ½ teaspoon natural dish soap and 1 ½ teaspoons baking soda in a spray bottle and spray away! Let this solution cover the stain and let air dry completely. Vacuum up any remaining solution.
  • Rosemary Oil: Melt a bar of castile soap and mix with equal parts rubbing alcohol and rosemary essential oil. Allow the solution to thoroughly combine use on a rag to blot the area or use in a spray bottle. Using Rosemary essential oil will discourage your dog from eliminating in the area again.
  • Vinegar: After the original baking soda treatment, combine warm water and vinegar in a 1:1 ratio. Use this mixture to blot with a rag or use in a spray bottle.

Stain & Odor Removal for Hardwood Floors

  • Removing dog stains and odor from hardwood floors is much easier.
  • Remove any solids or wipe up with a rag
  • Using a cloth and warm, sudsy water clean the affected area
  • Wipe the area again with a cloth and clear, cool water.
  • Dry with a clean cloth

If you believe your dog’s indoor accidents are due to medical accidents, see your vet. Your dog could also be eliminating indoors because of stress such as adjusting to a move or a new baby in the house. Read our blog on House Training An Adult Dog for step on how to retrain your pup.

Bully Sticks are a great way to reward your dog for good behaviors. Check out our full line of all-natural dog treats and chews at

Dog Care 101 Tip #201: Outdoor Winter Play Ideas for Your Dog

It’s cold out and giving your dog lots of fun playtime inside is a great idea. However, knows your dog still needs lots of sunshine and fresh air. Outdoor winter play just takes a little planning. That’s why we’ve come up with a few ideas to help you and Fido enjoy your time outdoors, even if it is a bit chilly.

The Right Attire
Just like you, your dog will need protection from the elements when going outside in cold winter weather. If snow is involved, make sure you keep a waterproof coat on shorthaired dogs. Dog boots are also a good choice as ice and salted roads can cause paw irritation. Musher’s Secret is also great for protection for paws and toes during the winter. Always keep proper identification on your dog; more dogs get lost during the winter season than any other.

Food Games
Take your dog on a walk and with each block you go, treat your dog to special treats. This will entice your dog and give him energy to keep going.

Play hide and seek in the snow with a desirable treat, like a bully stick! Tuck a bully stick under the snow or in a remote place in your yard and let Fido loose. His powerful sense of smell will guide him to the treat, and he’ll love finding it!
read more…

BBS Recognizes Pet Dental Health Month

February is the month of love! And knows that one of the best ways you can love your dog is caring for his mouth! Yes, you read that right! Unfortunately pet dental health is often overlooked, and if left untreated can lead to serious health problems such as heart, lung and kidney disease.  Today, BBS will show you how to monitor and treat your dog’s dental health.

Warning Signs

  • Abnormally Bad Breath: By nature, dogs don’t have the sweetest of breath, but when something is wrong, your dog’s breath will be particularly bad.
  • Excessive Drooling
  • Swollen Gums
  • Tumors or cysts on gums or under the tongue
  • Loose Teeth

But what do the symptoms mean? Here are some of the most common dental problems your dog can encounter. 

Periodontal Disease: This is an infection that occurs between a tooth and the gum that causes tooth loss and can even spread to the rest of the body. This disease is very painful for dogs.

Gingivitis: Just like humans, dogs can get gingivitis, which is an issue caused by the buildup of plaque, tartar and bacteria on the gums. Swollen, reddened and bleeding gums and bad breath are all symptoms.

Halitosis: Bad breath can mean bad health. This is one of the first signs of many different oral issues and can be caused by stuck food or tartar build up.

Inflamed Gums: This is also caused by tartar build up or getting food particles stuck in teeth.

Mouth Tumors & Cysts: Lumps can begin forming on your dog’s gums because of neglected oral hygiene. These can sometimes be malignant and have to be surgically removed. Salivary cysts can also appear in your dog’s mouth. These large, fluid-filled blisters show up under the tongue or corners of the jaw. These sores require drainage and the damaged saliva gland must be removed. read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #200: Indoor Winter Play Ideas for Your Dog

Cold. Wet. Rainy. Snowy. Being outside in winter weather can tend to be miserable and staying cooped up indoors isn’t always so much fun either. The same is true for your dog; outdoor playtime might decrease dramatically or indoors your pup may not be stimulated enough. However, thinks winter months can force us to be creative with our day-to-day routine. We’ve come up indoor playtime activities for the winter months because, after all, your dog still needs exercise. 

Hide & Seek
Throw a treat to your dog and while they’re gobbling it up, run and hide in a different part of the house. Your dog will want to come find you if you have more treats and will tire your pooch out in the process. Use small, low calorie treats like Fruitables or Purebites.

Scavenging & Dinner Games
Remember your dog is a scavenger by nature and enabling these characteristics can stimulate both mind and body. Use a puzzle food bowl or a hollow dog toy like a Planet Dog Orbee-Tuff Snoop with frozen food to challenge your dog while he eats. You can also hide treats around the house and have your dog track down their location.

Indoor Agility Course & Training
A homemade agility course can test your dog’s navigation skills and stimulate brain and body. Use chairs as weave poles, using a broomstick over a couple buckets or holding a hula-hoop in your hands as a jump can make for a fun and rousing playtime. Winter can also be a great time to have dedicated training time with your dog. Want to teach your dog to high-five, shake or roll over? Use your regular outdoor playtime and substitute it for training. Your dog will emerge into Spring as a well trained pooch! read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #192: How To Have a Happier Dog

When your dog wags his tail, you know that he is excited, but is he content? knows that you try to provide your dog with the absolute best, but your dog’s happiness is more than just two meals a day and a belly rub. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a way to look at human motivation by piecing out essential physical, emotional and mental needs. With dogs being highly social creatures, many of these principles can be applied to develop a more complete four-legged best friend. Read on to find out how you really can have a happier dog.

Physiological (Pyhsical Needs)
Fresh Clean Water – Your dog’s water should be refreshed daily and free of debris. If a water bowl is kept outside, make sure it’s not stagnant (this can breed disease), frozen in winter or overheated in summer.

Good Nutrition – Every dog owner will have a different recipe for success with their dog’s food. There is no one right answer, but feeding your dog healthy and nutritious meals is important. Talk to your vet about good feeding options for your dog. Make sure your dog is in a healthy weight range as well; overweight dogs are very unhappy. Treating your dog is something that shouldn’t be hard either. A good bully stick or all-natural chew from BBS will guarantee your dog is getting a healthy, nutritious treat.

Exercise – Is your dog getting enough exercise? For the best health, your dog needs to expend their energy (which they always have plenty of). Exercise will make your dog’s life longer and fuller and prevent compulsive disorders or unwanted behavior. Breeds are different in their exercise needs, but all dogs do need it.

Hygiene – As much as possible, your dog needs to stay clean so they are comfortable in their own body and skin. Little things like dirty ears, long nails or tartar on teeth can lead to very serious and painful problems. Keeping a clean, brushed coat, trimmed nails, clean ears and teeth are one less potential discomfort your dog has to feel.

Chewing – Unlike humans, dogs have a need to chew. Providing the proper toys and chews will help them meet this desire without taking it out on your belongings.

A Place to “Go” – It’s very important for dogs to have a consistent place to use the bathroom away from their “den.” A highly normal dog will eliminate away from where they eat and sleep. Doing otherwise means they feel as if they aren’t given proper time or a place to do so. read more…

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