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April is Heartworm Awareness Month

April is Heartworm Awareness Month & Best Bully Sticks wants to make sure you’re protecting your pup from these nasty pests! Here are a few quick tips on how to address heartworm prevention and make sure your furry family member is getting the protection they need. But first, let’s look at what heartworms are and how your dog can contract them.

What Are Heartworms?

Mosquitoes are the carriers of heartworm larvae, called microfilariae. The mosquitoes pick up the larvae when they feed on an infected animal who already has the microfilariae in it’s bloodstream and then pass the larvae off on the next feeding host, which in some cases can be dogs. If your dog isn’t on a consistent dosage of heartworm meds, then the larvae mature into heartworms and will work their way to the heart and lungs. This process can take up to 6 months with no detectable signs and heartworms can reach up to 12 inches in length live up to 7 years in your dog’s organs.


1. Prevention Starts at the Vet’s Office: Make sure you talk to your vet about which heartworm medication will be right for your dog. There are a few different forms of heartworm medication that are available, such as oral, topical and injectable preventatives. They will all have their pro’s and con’s, so talking to your vet is always the first step.

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Dog Care 101 – Tip #159: How To Choose A Good Dog Groomer

When the air turns warm, we humans shed our winter coats and don filp-flops, tank tops and shorts with the intention being comfortable outdoors. However, humans aren’t the only ones shedding winter coats. Our pups are getting rid of that winter fur too and want to be outside as much as we do!

Best Bully Sticks knows that warm weather and thick fur don’t mix and so it’s up to you, the loving owner, to help your pup shed their winter coat. Many owners groom their pups themselves, but not all owners have the know-how, tools, experience or even physical ability to groom their dogs properly. That’s where a groomer comes in. But how do you know how to pick a good and trustworthy groomer? Best Bully Sticks will help the tips and tricks of choosing a good groomer!

Grooming can consist of brushing, combing, bathing, clipping nails, cutting out matted hair, cleaning ears and medicated baths or treatments. So, don’t just think of grooming as a hair cut. It can meet a lot of different needs.

Finding a groomer should start with asking your trusted friends, your vet, boarding kennel, dog trainer or local animal shelter who they might recommend. All of these people might have a good “go-to” groomer they trust. Checking online for “Pet Groomer” or the National Dog Groomers Association of America’s website is a good option, too. Calling the Better Business Bureau for any registered complaints is also a safe step to take. read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #158: Preventing & Treating Canine Obesity

Best Bully Sticks knows that you love spoiling your dog, but you might want to reconsider feeding Fido those table scraps during dinner. It seems that pet obesity is a growing problem in the U.S., a fact made clear by a recent article published by WebMD, which listed obesity among the top five issues facing pets. There are a number of reasons why owners may unintentionally allow their dog to plump up; dogs may not get daily exercise, they could overeat, or they could be eating food unsuitable for a healthy animal diet.

Pet obesity can cause complicated medical problems if left untreated. It’s proven to be a contributing factor to heart disease, diabetes, respiratory problems and bone and joint issues. An overweight dog is not a happy, healthy pet no matter how many treats you give him.

Unfortunately, many people remain ignorant about what their dogs can and cannot eat on a regular basis. This may simply be because dog obesity isn’t a widely covered issue and owners may not think twice about proper dietary and exercise for their four-legged friends. Let’s take some time to recognizing canine obesity and addressing basic preventative methods so you can enjoy your dog’s company for a long time.

How can you tell if your pet is overweight?
Too many owners confuse a fat dog for a healthy one. As stated before, pet obesity is serious business, so if you have any suspicion that your dog is overweight, check for these few key signs. read more…

Dog Care 101 Tip #157: Allergy Relief For Your Dog

Last week Best Bully Sticks covered how allergies affect our pooch pals and how a reaction will most likely look. (To find out more, read “Recognize Your Dog’s Allergic Reactions”) This week’s tip focuses in on how to treat your dog’s allergic reactions as they pertain to skin symptoms.

Allergy Testing
The first step may be figuring out exactly what is causing an allergic reaction. This usually entails a trip to the vet’s office and a blood or skin test to determine the offending allergen. The next step, of course, will be limiting exposure to that allergen.

Preventative Measures
After you know how to recognize the reaction and exactly what it is, there are some avoidance measures you can take to help cut down on your pet’s reactions. For instance, keeping your dog out of the room for several hours while vacuuming and changing furnace filters will aid against house dust allergens. When treating a dog with sensitivity to pollen, keep them out of fields, keep your grass cut short, rinse your dog’s feet after being outside and keep your dog inside when high pollen counts have been forecast. read more…

Loving On Your Dog Means Caring For His Teeth

Best Bully Sticks wishes you and your pup a HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY!  For this day of love we chose to talk about doggie dental care.  It may not seem to have any connection, but we know that truly loving your dog means really caring for them as well.  February 14th is the day of love, but the month of February recognizes National Pet Dental Health.

National Pet Dental Health Month is dedicated to educating pet owners about good dental hygiene for their furry friends. If you didn’t know, poor oral hygiene in dogs and cats can lead to serious health complications such as periodontal disease so upkeep of your pet’s teeth and gums is very important.

“Most people have no idea that dental health is so important to their pets, and that’s why Pet Dental Health Month is such a great idea,” explains Dr. Larry Corry, president of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). “In fact, veterinarians report that periodontal disease is the most commonly diagnosed problem in dogs and cats.

Proper pet oral hygiene helps your dog & cat ward off bad breath, tarter build up, plague, sickness, periodontal gum and heart disease. If proper dental care is not taken seriously, dirty plaque can be the breeding ground for bacteria which can wreak havoc on your dog’s bodily systems and cause heart, liver and kidney problems. So, during your grooming & teeth brushing sessions check for pain, swelling, redness, abscesses, foul odors (halitosis), and loose or broken teeth in need of immediate vet attention. If your dog is having trouble chewing and swallowing then a dental checkup is in order.

Tips for Top-Notch Teeth!

Regular teeth cleanings are very important. You should clean your pets teeth 2-3 times per week. Purchase a special pet toothpaste & toothbrush. Never use human toothpaste since pets cannot spit or rinse. The key to successful teeth brushing is to start your pet off slowly so your pet can adapt. Teeth brushings aren’t normal for dogs, so be gentle and use positive reinforcement. To make teeth brushing easy for the both of you, it is important to acclimate your anxious & often fearful pet. Start by placing toothpaste on your fingers and gently rubbing them in your pet’s mouth. Not only will this get your pet accustomed to the taste of toothpaste and fingers, it will be a lot easier to introduce a toothbrush.

Also, plan a yearly physical which includes an oral checkup from your vet. Your vet will let you know of any oral hygiene issues you might have missed. Your vet might also suggests a professional cleaning if they deem it necessary. Consult with your vet further about any specific health risk for your pet prior to procedure since anesthesia will be used. Remember each pet’s circumstance is unique.

Another great and way to help your pup’s dental health is chewing bully sticks from BBS! Our bully sticks and most of our other treats act as natural flossers for dogs and help clean tarter and bacteria off of teeth and gums. We’ve pulled together a list of perfect dental dog chews for all shapes and sizes of pets at on our website to show how much oral health means to BBS.


101 Dog Care Tips: Tip 149 – Making Bath Time More Enjoyable For Your Dog

Here at Best Bully Sticks, we know that not all aspects of dog ownership will be enjoyable for you or your pet.  One of those could be bath time.  If your dog is anxious about getting a bath and is a pain to clean, chances are you aren’t enjoying the struggle involved either. If you’ve owned your dog from puppy-hood the process of making bath time stress-free may be a little easier, but no matter the age, your dog can still learn to like baths.  Here are a few ways to ease your dog into coping with bath time.

Creature Comforts: Creating A Comfortable Environment For Bath Time. If you think your dog is generally okay with baths, here’s a sure-fire test. If your dog doesn’t take food or a treat from you while in the bath, it means your pup isn’t comfortable.  There are a couple reasons why the physical environment of your bathroom isn’t calming to your dog.  One of the best ways to enhance a dog’s physical presence in the tub is a non-skid bath mat or even a towel.  If a dog doesn’t have traction, they won’t feel physically at ease in any situation. When bathing your dog, remember that hot water doesn’t always equal cleanliness.  A lukewarm temperature will be comfortable for your dog and won’t dry out their skin as hot water would.

Chaotic To Calm: Changing Your Dog’s Perceptions About Baths. After you make the dog physically comfortable in the bath, the next step is emotional comfort.  Anxiety about baths can change if a dog is eased into relating the bathroom to a place where good things happen.  Anytime you are in the bathroom, lead your dog in and give them a treat. Next, step into the tub and give your dog a treat. Even try feeding your dog in the bathroom and slowly move their food into the actual tub as they become more comfortable.  For dogs who get bathed in sinks, it’s the same idea. Work to slowly move toward the sink, putting your pup down and giving them a training treat each time you move a step closer.  Reiterate this practice until the dog is calm.

Water, Water, Everywhere: A Word On Water. When your dog gets comfortable with the idea of being in the bath, try turning on a small amount of water. If you begin squirting, spraying or dumping water on your dog, the fear of baths will return.  Pour just enough water to get your dog’s feet wet and see how they react. If it’s positive, very slowly add a little water to wet his legs more, then the body.  Again, go slowly with the head, ears and neck of your dog. During this first session, you might not even want to use shampoo.  The goal is just to keep your dog calm during this process.  If you did shampoo, it would mean rinsing and thus adding considerable time with water in the tub.

Slow & Steady Wins The Race: Being Patient With The Process. Conditioning your dog to thinking more positively about baths will take time.  Remember that this may not be an overnight change, but if you are persistent, you will reap the benefits of a stress-free doggie bath. Two of the biggest things to remember: go very slowly & reinforce with small dog treats (positive reinforcement.)  A clean dog just might truly become a happy dog.  Happy training!


101 Dog Care Tips: Tip 148 – How to Treat a Doggie Cold

Dogs can get colds just like their owners.  If your dog has a cough, runny nose and eyes, sneezing, general lethargy and loss of appetite, he or she might just have a cold.  Also similar to human colds, dog colds aren’t severe. Here are a few tips on helping your pup get back to romping around.

Comfy & Cozy: Keep Your Dog Warm & Dry. You’ll need to make sure your dog stays inside as much as possible. Cold air can further constrict a dog’s bronchial tubes if they are having a hard time breathing. Routine potty breaks outside should remain normal, but when inside keep your pup warm by adding blanket to their bed, covering them up or putting a hot water bottle in their covers.

Calories Every Day Keeps the Doctor Away: Making Sure Your Dog Eats and Drinks. If your dog seems indifferent toward their food, there are a few ways to get their calorie intake up.  If your dog won’t eat dry food, try a hot low sodium chicken broth, or mixing up a combination of veggies, boiled chicken and rice.  Your dog is certain to be interested. Making sure your dog stays hydrated is equally important. If they don’t seem to want to drink water, try a sports drink or add an electrolyte mix to their water. (Always check with your vet about the ingredients on these products!) This helps to replace fluids that your pup may be losing to mucus production.

Doggies In The Mist: Vapor & Moisture. There are a few ways to help break up your dog’s congestion. Turn on a very hot shower and sit in a closed bathroom with your dog. You can also use a humidifier, which creates the same effect.  Both of these will help loosen any mucus your dog has built up.

The key to helping your dog get over a cold is pretty simple–If it works for you, it just might work for your dog. If the symptoms become more intense, please take your dog to the vet. It could possibly be something more serious than a cold.  Illnesses such as Parainfluenza, Kennel Cough or Canine Distemper are all more serious ailments that could be disguised as a cold. If you’re an attentive dog owner, you’ll pick up on the difference in a common cold and something more serious. Never second guess taking your prized pup to the doctor. We hope these tips help if your pet experiences a doggie cold!

101 Dog Care Tips – Tip 147: Keeping Your Canine Companion Warm This Winter

At Best Bully Sticks, we believe snuggling up with a dog on a frigid winter night is one of the greatest joys in life.  However, during the winter months your dog might need a little extra warmth.  Shivering, curling up into a tight ball, or getting closer to heat sources are a few signs Fido is cold.  Here are a few tips to help your dog stay nice and cozy this winter.

More Dreaming, Less Shivering: Keeping Your Dog Toasty Through the Night.

One thing to keep in mind is the placement of their bed, so make sure it’s out of the way of drafty windows or doorways.  As owner’s we wear socks in the winter to keep our feet off the cold floor, but the floor being where you pup sleeps, he might need a little extra padding as well. So if your dog’s bed is thin, provide an extra bottom layer by placing a towel or blanket underneath.  Also, some dogs like to burrow into blankets and by giving them an extra blanket on top of their bed, they’ll be able to stay warm through the night.

A Home of My Own: Winter for Outside Dogs.

If your dog is outside in the winter months, make sure they have good shelter and can stay out of wind and precipitation. The shelter needs to be sturdy, with no possible areas for leaks.  A good bed of fresh straw or cedar chips make good bedding.  If it ever becomes exceptionally cold for prolonged periods of time, bring your dog in for added warmth.

Chilly Dog Navy Alpine Handmade SweaterAn Extra Layer of Fur: Dog Sweaters & Jackets.

Whether your dog is out for a walk or needs a little warming up around the house, a sweater is the right answer.  Bundling up your dog is just as important as bundling up yourself during the winter months. A good knit weave is a favorite option among dog owners but if you live in a snowy climate, a nylon material will keep the moisture at bay.  If winter brings ice your way, all-weather doggie booties, like Rubber Dog Boots, will keep your pup’s paws warm. Even something as simple as Mushers Secret Paw Protection will help protect your dog’s paws and pads on the harshest winter day.

A Little Can Go A Long Way: Feeding Your Dog A Bit More.

Dogs burn extra calories throughout the winter to maintain warmth. By feeding your dog a little extra, they keep warmer easier. A little bit means a little bit.  You don’t want to overfeed your dog.  As always, keep your dog’s water bowl filled up too. They always need a good amount of water each day.


Does Your Canine Display Signs Of Phobias?

Does Your Canine Display Signs Of Phobias?

A lot of dogs display fears without seeming to have a reason. Similar to the way in which some people react when they observe a spider, many canines react suddenly to a host of stimuli. The reasons vary and can range from a negative episode experienced early in life to a lack of proper training and socialization. Whatever the cause, canines can – and do – suffer from phobias that influence their behaviors.

For owners, these phobias can become deeply frustrating since they may prevent them from enjoying their canines’ company. In severe cases, many owners give up, abandoning their pets to shelters. This article will briefly describe several phobias that affect millions of dogs.

Fear Of Being Separated From You

Separation anxiety is a heartbreaking disorder to observe in canines. When left alone, they become distraught, barking, whining, drooling, and pacing the ground, waiting for their owners to return. Sometimes, the fear motivates them to escape in an attempt to rejoin their owners.

This is one of the most difficult fears to address. It involves desensitizing the dog to his owner’s absence, a process that requires substantial time and patience.

Anxiety Over Thunder

A lot of dogs are easily frightened by sudden, loud noises, such as gun shots and car backfires. Distress over thunder is slightly different. Experts believe that canines can sense a change in atmospheric pressure, causing them to be more on edge than normal. When claps of thunder occur, the animals become frightened. In response, they might hide or display destructive behavior.

Distress About Car Rides

Many pets become anxious when riding in vehicles. Some will refuse to even enter a car, backing away from it or barking when their owners attempt to force them in. This might stem from an early experience during which the animal was taken to a place he disliked. Or, the rumble of the engine and sensation beneath his paws while on the road may have seemed unpleasant to him.

Apprehension Around Kids

Young kids can scare dogs, creating a phobia in them that lasts for years. This can happen for a variety of reasons. For example, a child may pull on a dog’s tail or ears, causing him pain. Or, a child may not realize that approaching a canine suddenly may be misinterpreted by the animal as an act of aggression. Or, the pet may have had little to no exposure to young people early in his life, and is thus unfamiliar with them.

It is important to always supervise the interaction between a dog and child. Otherwise, the animal’s fear could prompt a reaction that results in the child’s injury.

shutterstock_53488045Anxiety About Visiting The Vet

For dogs, a veterinary clinic is rarely a pleasant place to visit for the first time. Not only is everything unfamiliar, but the animals are usually subjected to poking, prodding, and on occasion, vaccination shots. It’s common for canines to develop an aversion, often to the point of recognizing the roads taken to the vet’s office. With time, however, this phobia tends to dissipate as dogs become more familiar with their veterinarians.

Fear Of Unfamiliar People

A lot of canines become tense whenever strangers are nearby. Sometimes, their stress is mild, causing them to remain alert. Other times, the stress is severe, prompting the animal to bark and growl at the person.

This problem often develops in dogs that receive little to no exposure to new people. It may also develop as the result of mistreatment by strangers in the past.

Most canine phobias can be treated successfully with desensitization training. Although the process is long and sometimes exasperating, owners are rewarded with less anxious companions.

8 Pet Toxins & Poisons In Your Home

Do You Know What Pet Toxins & Poisons Are In Your Home?

There is a growing pet epidemic on the raise. What is it you say? Each year thousands of dogs and cats suffer from accidental poisoning from the ingestion of household cleaners, plants, medications, common foods and pesticides. There is a lot of truth to the proverb “curiosity killed the cat” but we can’t forget that dogs often fall victim.

Understanding your pets health risk and dangers comes with the territory of being a responsible owner & parent of our furry citizens. Playing  a crucial role in helping you  provide your pet with a safe home to grow, fetch, sleep & play.


 So what are the most common top pet toxins to BE-WARE of?

1. Acteminophen can be found in Tylenol. Although great pain reliever & fever reducer for humans if ingested is lethal to pets. It only takes 1 pill to kill a cat and can cause kidney & liver failure in dogs.

2. Ibuprofen common brands include Advil, Midol, Motrin.

3. Plants are beautiful but can be poisonous & deadly if ingested by your pet. Here are a list of plants to avoid:

*Christmas tree pine needles
*Easter Cacti
*Mulch with Cocoa beans
*Sago Palm

4. Human Food include avocadoes, chocolate, coffee, raisins, nutmeg, onions, grapes,  garlic, raw salmon and sweetener Xylitol found  in sugar free candy & gum. Of course the list goes on.

5. Household Cleaners can cause serious chemical burns if licked & consumed

6. Anti-freeze with its sweet smelling aroma will prompt our pets to lick away.

7. Pesticides

8. OTC flea medication contain the insecticide pyrethrin & permethrin that can be just as harmful as the fleas that plague your pet. Opt for a more all natural flea preventive route. Always consult your vet before using any type of medication.

Remember that your pet is not invincible and can become seriously ill & die from the ingest of these household hazards. Many of them lurk under kitchen cabinets, in garages, driveway, backyards, trash cans  and pose as beautiful floral centerpieces. Here are a few tips to help in the prevention of accidental poisoning and keep your inquisitive pet safe & toxic-free.

1. Bag & Cover it! Use covered trash cans to prevent access to empty cleaning bottles, table scraps, leftover foods, disposed medications.

2. Not a Pet Zone. Keep pets out of garages & sheds and away from oil and anti-freeze leaks. Pets will be tempted by the spilled sweet smelling scent of anti-freeze in your garage, driveway, on the street or in parking lots.

3. Store cleaners away safely out of paws reach. Keeping clean house is important for the health & well being of your family. So be careful where you store potentially hazardous cleaning products. You see, pets are sneaky & quite resourceful and will use their smarts to gain access to your cleaning stash found in lower cabinets or empty bottles in trash cans.  If storing your cleaners under your cabinets make sure it is under lock and key. Better yet, opt for more eco-friendly, safe & toxic free household cleaning alternatives (Greenworks, Method, Mrs. Meyers, 7th Generations)

4. Ain’t no Watering Hole! During Christmas, cover tree water so pets are not tempted to take a sip. You see pine needles are poisonous to dogs & cats.

As always, if you suspect your beloved pet have ingested a poison. Don’t wait, please seek vet emergency help quickly and in a timely manner. Please note the amount ingested and contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.


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Give the gift of a good chew. Delicious & all natural, the way nature intended!

Please make sure to check out our growing selection of dog treats & chews, and of course our bully sticks. Try our odor free bully sticks!

Take The Guessing Out Of Gift Giving With A Best Bully Stick Gift Certificate!

But what do you do for the pampered pup or feline that has everything? Hmmm..For the pet that has everything give a Best Bully’s Gift Certificate and take the guessing out of gift giving! This is a great way for you to give that furry special someone in your life or loving pet owner a special gift by allowing them to select the exact products their furry companion are looking for.

A picture is worth a thousand words, or shall we say free bully sticks!

Our photo gallery is growing constantly, please submit a photo of your dog enjoying any of our products to enter our twice monthly contest! Each month we will have a drawing on those customers who submitted pictures to the gallery and a winner will be chosen and posted on the site. The winner will win more bully sticks!

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