We at Best Bully Sticks are partial to pugs, after all, pugs got us started in the bully stick business! (Thanks, Sushi & Espy!) We’re very excited today to share the great story and dedication of Pug Rescue of Sacramento and we had the pleasure of speaking with Janet Grover, President of PROS. They won a BBS Giveaway last month and we’re so excited to feature them on the blog! Read more about PROS below!

 When & Why did you start?
A breeder in the Sacramento area saw the need for a pug rescue in the early 1990′s and started the rescue.  In 1996 we were incorporated as a California Public Benefit Corp.  In May of 2003 we became a federal non-profit. 

What’s different about your rescue?
We are breed specific and only rescue pugs and pug mixes.  We are an all-volunteer group with most of our volunteers who have full time jobs, families and pugs of their own and volunteer with us.

What’s the most rewarding thing about working at your rescue?
The most rewarding thing is finding great forever homes for the pugs that we take in.  We pull from shelters and also take owner surrenders due to various circumstances i.e. foreclosures and can’t find a rental that will take dogs, divorces and the owners are moving into apartments that don’t allow animals or from a person who passes away and the relatives don’t want the pug.

What is the greatest success story or “win” that your rescue has had?
I think one of the greatest stories is a little black female puppy that we received a call from a volunteer at a shelter.  I was told she had front leg deformities and the shelter would put her down as they would consider her unadoptable.  I had to give it some quick thought and said we would take her in.  As the intake coordinator I called a foster home who liked to foster puppies and left a message.  The funny message I left on the answering machine was that I was down on bended knees begging them to take her as I didn’t have another foster home to put her in.  About 10 minutes later the foster home called me back and was laughing so hard as she stated she could visualize me on my knees. 

We met the shelter volunteer in a parking lot of a grocery store and then drove her to the foster home.  When we arrived we put her on the floor and watched her hop like a kangaroo around the living room and she was able to use her front legs as leverage to go up the doggie stairs to the couch. 

When she got a little older her story went on our website and a lady from another country’s mother bought her a front end cart so she could be more mobile. 

Eventually the foster home adopted her and hired trainers who work with disabled dogs and taught her how to use her cart to go with gravel, up curbs and through grass.  She is now a therapy dog at the local VA clinic and brightens the spirits of the veterans coming home with a missing limb.  She also goes to a convalescent hospital to visit and cheer up the people there.

What can people do to help your rescue?
People can help us by donating money, supplies such has heartworm meds, Frontline plus flea meds.  If someone lives in Northern California we can always use additional foster homes especially for senior pugs and we have a retirement program for dogs that we don’t adopt out due to age or medical needs.  If someone wants to help, our website is http://www.pugpros.org.  We have a fundraiser coming up mid Sept.—Poker for Pug tournament.  No experience necessary.  It is held at a local Italian restaurant and includes a buffet dinner and door prizes.  We are getting many great, donated door prizes.

Thank you to Janet & the rest of the volunteers at PROS! We truly appreciate all the work you do for pugs in your area!

Read more inspiring stories and see great before and after dog transformation photos by reading more of our Rescue Spotlights!